WWW.THESIS.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Thesis, documentation, books
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |   ...   | 21 |

«Enhancing the Role of Georgian Migrants at Home (ERGEM) Project Georgian Diaspora and Migrant Communities in Germany, Greece and Turkey Transnational ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

This project is funded by

the European Union

Enhancing the Role of Georgian Migrants at Home (ERGEM) Project

Georgian Diaspora and Migrant

Communities in Germany, Greece and

Turkey

Transnational realities and ties with Georgia

Georgian Diaspora and Migrant Communities in Germany, Greece and Turkey

Transnational realities and ties with Georgia

Prepared by the International Centre for Migration Policy Development, Vienna - Austria

Funded by the European Union

International Centre for Migration Policy Development • April 2014 ISBN: 978-3-902880-25-3 Executive Summary The objective of this study was to assess different and specific needs of Georgian migrant and diaspora* communities in Germany, Greece and Turkey, as well as these communities’ interest and potential to engage in transnational development activities for the benefit of the country of current residence and Georgia. A combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods has been applied to shed light on the characteristics of the heterogeneous Georgian diaspora.

The study has confirmed that the profile of the Georgian diaspora in these three countries differs. Therefore, this needs to be taken into account when formulating policy responses.

 Migration to Germany is mostly well organised and regular. Georgian citizens migrate there largely for educational purposes, with many young professionals arriving through formal study and employment programmes (e.g. au pair programmes).

 Most migrants in Greece are predominantly female and engage in domestic work. It is a destination for older and less educated migrants (compared to migrants in Germany) who often find themselves in an irregular status and find it difficult to adapt to the country and are, therefore, often socially excluded.

 Turkey is a convenient location for temporary labour migration, as Georgian migrants benefit from a visa-free regime there. Similar to Greece, it is a destination for female domestic migrant workers (housekeepers, caretakers, nannies, etc.), but it is also attractive for migrants seeking seasonal work on tea and hazelnut plantations, in factories, etc. and physical labour in construction, privately-owned workshops, etc.

In all three countries, ties between Georgian migrants, diaspora individuals and Georgia are strong, as shown by the general lack of interest in obtaining the citizenship of the country of residence, the wish to return home and the frequency of home visits. These ties are reinforced by diaspora organisations, which create bridges between Georgia and the residence country and promote the Georgian culture and language. The large majority of Georgian migrants, in particular those who have children in Georgia, send remittances, which are mainly used for investments in farm equipment, health and education. Survey respondents are generally willing to invest in private sector activities and development activities in Georgia. The educational level among Georgian migrants is relatively high. Survey respondents consider the experience and skills they gained during their period abroad as useful for Georgia. This suggests that involving Georgian migrants and diaspora members in development activities, especially activities involving the transfer of their knowledge and skills, would greatly benefit Georgia and its society. However, brain waste seems to be a common issue among Georgian migrants in the three countries, as most considers themselves to be working below their level of qualification.

In response to having identified a certain lack of trust between the migrants, diaspora individuals and organisations, Georgian state institutions and representations abroad, the study makes several recommendations for improving relations, supporting Georgian migrants during their stay abroad and increasing their potential as development

actors:

a) Improve information collection and analysis for the design of better policies to protect Georgian migrant and diaspora communities abroad through enhanced coordination capacities of the State Diaspora Office, assessments of Georgian migrants’ and diaspora individuals’ needs, better contacts with state institutions in the main destination countries, establishing clear reporting lines on information exchange between involved Georgian state organisations and better cooperation between consular representations abroad and the MFA Consular Department in Tbilisi.

b) Enhance the provision of better services and information for Georgian migrant and diaspora communities abroad, in particular in the areas of employment abroad and recognition of qualifications, return and reintegration, and support active diaspora organisations.

c) Unleash the development potential of migrant and diaspora organisations through targeted support and *The term ‘diaspora’ is used throughout the study for the sake of convenience. It comprises all Georgian migrant communities, including the Georgian historical diaspora, temporary and circular migrants, emigrants, expatriates, and Georgians who took on another citizenship and who were naturalised in their country of destination.

funding for diaspora organisations; establish contact and communication with cities and local authorities in areas where Georgian migrants and diaspora communities reside to find common solutions on how to better support diaspora organisations; promote cooperation between civil society organisations and local authorities in Georgia; facilitate a regular dialogue between Georgian diaspora organisations, the Diaspora Office and the Georgian representations abroad; and support Georgian diaspora business start-ups.





The study was carried out within the ‘Enhancing the Role of Georgian Migrants at Home (ERGEM)’ project funded by the European Union’s Thematic Programme for Cooperation with Third Countries in the Areas of Migration and Asylum and by Turkey. The project is being implemented under the leadership of the Danish Refugee Council in cooperation with the International Centre for Migration Policy Development and a consortium of project partners and associated partners which includes the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Turkey, the Ministry of the Interior of Poland, the Public Service Development Agency (Ministry of Justice of Georgia), the Office of the State Minister of Georgia for Diaspora Issues and the Ministry of Internally Displaced Persons from the Occupied Territories, Refugees and Accommodation of Georgia.

Acknowledgements The authors gratefully acknowledge the invaluable information and assistance provided by the Georgian state institutions working in the area of migration, the Georgian consulates and representations in Germany, Greece and Turkey, the approached Georgian diaspora organisations and individual migrants in Germany, Greece and Turkey, the family members of Georgian migrants, and the human rights and migration organisations in the researched countries. In particular, we would like to thank the Bielefeld German-Georgian Society, the Brandenburgisch-Georgische Gesellschaft e.V., the Georgian Culture House – Chveneburi, the Georgisches Haus in Berlin e.V., the Georgian Counselling Centre in Athens, the Georgian-Greek Cultural Association, the Georgian Institute of Athens and the Georgian Sports and Cultural Association – “Georgia” that responded to our cooperation request and significantly contributed to this study. Finally, we would like to thank the European Commission and the Member States of the European Union for supporting and funding the ERGEM project.

International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD) Gonzagagasse 1 A-1010 Vienna Austria www.icmpd.org International Centre for Migration Policy Development Austria, 2014 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, copied or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission of the copyright owners.

This publication has been produced with the assistance of the European Union. The contents of this publication is the sole responsibility of ICMPD and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the donor.

Printed and bound in Austria by Ost West Media ISBN: 978-3-902880-25-3 Authors This case study is based on the research carried out within the EU-funded ERGEM project. The team of authors listed below (in alphabetical order) significantly contributed to the development of the research instruments, the field work carried out, the initiation of contact with diaspora organisations and individual migrants in the researched countries, as well as with migrants’ family members in Georgia, and the drafting and editing of the study.

International Centre for Migration Policy Development:

Keti Gorgoshidze, ERGEM Junior Project Officer, completed a Master’s in Development Studies at Lund University, and a Bachelor’s in Sociology at Tbilisi State University. She has experience in working on migration issues in state institutions and NGOs. She joined ICMPD in 2013.

Marion Noack, ERGEM Project Officer, studied international development at the University of Vienna. Since 2011 she has worked for the Competence Centre for Migration and Development at ICMPD and has been involved in projects and research studies on environmentally induced migration, migration and development policies, and migrant and diaspora organisations.

Xenia Pilipenko, ERGEM Junior Project Officer, studied global history at the London School of Economics and the University of Vienna. She has worked for ICMPD since 2011 on projects in Moldova and Georgia, on government-academia relations and diaspora relations.

Magda Sabadello, ERGEM Project Assistant, has degrees in peace and conflict studies from the European Peace University in Austria. She has worked for ICMPD since March 2014 on various projects implemented by the Competence Centre for Migration and Development and the Competence Centre for Legal Migration and Integration.

Violeta Wagner, ERGEM Project Manager, has an international law background and more than 10 years of practical experience in working for state administration in the area of migration. She has worked for ICMPD since 2010 and since 2011 she has managed migration-related projects in Georgia.

Georgian institutions:

Gvantsa Abesadze, Secretary for Legal Support at the Secretariat of State Commission on Migration Issues, Ministry of Justice of Georgia, has a practical and educational background in law and more than nine years of practical experience in managerial positions at the Public Service Development Agency’s different departments.

Nino Gachechiladze, of the Consular Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, studied at Tbilisi State University at the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences. She has been working at the Consular Department since 2010.

Mariam Keburia, Coordinator for International Relations at the State Minister’s Office on Diaspora Issues, has experience in working with international organisations in the field of migration. She has worked for the Office of the State Minister on Diaspora Issues since 2012.

Table of Contents List of Tables

List of Figures

List of Acronyms

Foreword

Section I. Study on Georgian Diaspora and Migrant Communities in Germany, Greece and Turkey

1. Introduction

2. Methodological Approach

2.1. Research questions

2.2. Research design

2.3. Profile of the survey respondents

2.4. Limitations

3. The Georgian Diaspora Policy

3.1. Governmental institutions involved in the development and implementation of the Georgian policy towards its diaspora and migrants abroad

3.2. Collection of information on Georgian migrants abroad

3.3. Methods and tools for communication with Georgians abroad

3.4. Inter-institutional coordination on diaspora issues

3.5. Development needs in Georgia and potential for diaspora engagement.................23

3.6. Pre-departure initiatives and assistance provided to returnees

4. The Profile of the Georgian Diaspora in Germany, Greece and Turkey

4.1. Introduction

4.2. Size of the Georgian diaspora population in the three residence countries.............25

4.3. Socio-demographic profile

4.4. Types of migration

4.5. Situation of Georgian migrants

4.6. Transnational activities of Georgians living abroad

4.6.1. Ties with Georgia

4.6.2. Georgian diaspora organisations

4.6.3. Potential of the Georgian diaspora to contribute to development in Georgia...36

5. Conclusions

6. Outlook and Recommendations

Section II: Country Chapters

7. The Georgian Diaspora in Germany

7.1. Introduction

7.2. Profile of the Georgian diaspora in Germany

7.2.1. Size and location of the Georgian diaspora population in Germany.................47 7.2.2. Socio-demographic profile

7.2.3. Types of migration, causes and motives

7.2.4. Situation of Georgian migrants in Germany

7.3. Transnational activities of Georgians residing in Germany

7.3.1. Ties between the Georgians residing in Germany and Georgia

7.3.2. Organisations of the Georgian diaspora in Germany

7.3.3. Potential of the Georgian diaspora residing in Germany to contribute to development in Georgia

8. The Georgian Diaspora in Greece

8.1. Introduction

8.2. Profile of the Georgian diaspora

8.2.1. Size and location of the Georgian diaspora population

8.2.2. Socio-demographic profile

8.2.3. Types of migration, causes and motives

8.2.4. Situation of Georgian migrants in Greece

8.3. Transnational activities of Georgians residing in Greece

8.3.1. Ties between Georgians residing in Greece and Georgia

8.3.2. Organisations of the Georgian diaspora

8.3.3. Potential of the Georgian diaspora residing in Greece to contribute to development in Georgia

9. The Georgian Diaspora in Turkey

9.1. Introduction

9.2. Profile of the Georgian diaspora

9.2.1. Size and location of the Georgian diaspora population

9.2.2. Socio-demographic profile

9.2.3. Types of migration, causes and motives



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |   ...   | 21 |


Similar works:

«Towards universal social Social Development protection Latin American pathways and policy tools SIMONE CECCHINI FERNANDO FILGUEIRA RODRIGO MARTÍNEZ CECILIA ROSSEL Editors Towards universal social protection Latin American pathways and policy tools Simone Cecchini Fernando Filgueira Rodrigo Martínez Cecilia Rossel Editors Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) Santiago, November 2015 ECLAC Books Alicia Bárcena Executive Secretary Antonio Prado Deputy Executive...»

«Research report Employer Engagement and Jobcentre Plus by Anne Bellis, Maria Sigala and Sara Dewson Department for Work and Pensions Research Report No 742 Employer engagement and Jobcentre Plus Anne Bellis, Maria Sigala and Sara Dewson A report of research carried out by the Institute for Employment Studies on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions © Crown copyright 2011. You may re-use this information (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of...»

«Erwerbswünsche und Erwerbsbeteiligung EUROPÄISCHE STIFTUNG zur Verbesserung der Lebensund Arbeitsbedingungen Erwerbswünsche und Erwerbsbeteiligung Die Europäische Stiftung zur Verbesserung der Lebensund Arbeitsbedingungen ist eine autonome Einrichtung der Europäischen Union, deren Aufgabe es ist, bei der Festlegung der künftigen Politik in sozialen und arbeitsrechtlichen Fragen unterstützend zu wirken. Weitere Informationen sind über die Website der Stiftung erhältlich:...»

«Discussion Paper No. 05-08 Policy Innovation in Local Jurisdictions: Testing the Neighborhood Influence Against the Free-Riding Hypothesis Johannes Rincke Discussion Paper No. 05-08 Policy Innovation in Local Jurisdictions: Testing the Neighborhood Influence Against the Free-Riding Hypothesis Johannes Rincke Download this ZEW Discussion Paper from our ftp server: ftp://ftp.zew.de/pub/zew-docs/dp/dp0508.pdf Die Discussion Papers dienen einer möglichst schnellen Verbreitung von neueren...»

«NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Derbyshire Constabulary Home Working Guidance POLICY REFERENCE 09/270 This guidance is suitable for Public Disclosure Owner of Doc: HR Manager Services Date Approved: 5 October 2009 Review Date: October 2016 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED INDEX Heading Page No 1. Guidance Identification Page 2. Legislative Compliance 3. Introduction 4. Procedures 6. Monitoring and Review 7. Appeals 8. Appendices NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 1. Guidance...»

«Belief Merging and the Discursive Dilemma: An Argument-Based Account to Paradoxes of Judgment Aggregation Gabriella Pigozzi ∗ King’s College London Department of Computer Science, Strand WC2R 2LS London, UK email: gabriella@pigozzi.org Forthcoming in Synthese Abstract The aggregation of individual judgments on logically interconnected propositions into a collective decision on the same propositions is called judgment aggregation. Literature in social choice and political theory has claimed...»

«The final version of this document was published in August 2013. http://www.bis.org/publ/joint33.htm Basel Committee on Banking Supervision Joint Forum Mortgage insurance: market structure, underwriting cycle and policy implications Consultative document February 2013 The final version of this document was published in August 2013. http://www.bis.org/publ/joint33.htm The final version of this document was published in August 2013. http://www.bis.org/publ/joint33.htm This publication is...»

«GENERAL LEAGUE POLICIES FOR COACHES Coaches, this is a general policy guide for the Southwest Baseball League. It is not meant to be all encompassing for every possible situation that could arise. It covers the most basic and frequent questions / situation that may come up. The League Director and / or the League Board of Directors or Committees will decide any other questions / situations as they become apparent. Thank you for your support of SWBBL and youth baseball. SCHEDULE POLICY Once...»

«Local Government and Public Service Reform Initiative Consolidation or Fragmentation? The Size of Local Governments in Central and Eastern Europe Edited by PAWEL SWIANIEWICZ CONSOLIDATION OR FRAGMENTATION? L O C A L G O V E R N M E N T A N D P U B L I C S E RV I C E R E F O R M I N I T I A T I V E OPEN SOCIETY INSTITUTE Address Nádor utca 11. H-1051 Budapest, Hungary Mailing address P.O. Box 519 H-1357 Budapest, Hungary Te l e p h o n e (36-1) 327-3104 Fax (36-1) 327-3105 E-mail lgprog@osi.hu...»

«Small-Open-Economy Monetary Policy and Real and Nominal Exchange Rates: The Canadian Case John E. Floyd University of Toronto1 April 29, 2014 Abstract This paper presents an analysis of the relationship between Canadian monetary policy and real and nominal exchange rate movements vs. the U.S. using broad-based theory and 1974-2010 quarterly data. Contrary to the situation in the United States, real interest rates relevant for investment in Canada are determined in the world market and are not...»

«Monetary Policy Pass-Through: Household Consumption and Voluntary Deleveraging Marco Di Maggio Amir Kermani Rodney Ramcharan Current Draft: November 2014 Abstract Do households bene.t from expansionary monetary policy? We investigate how indebted households’ consumption and saving decisions are a¤ected by anticipated changes in monthly interest payments. We focus on borrowers with adjustable rate mortgages originated between 2005 and 2007 featuring an automatic reset of the interest rate...»

«The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.thesis.xlibx.info - Thesis, documentation, books

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.